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Google sued yet again for "rampant" copyright infringement

eGoogle-YouTube was sued yet again for rampant copyright infringement in U.S. District Court in New York.

Plaintiffs, including the English Football Association Premier League and others said in their court filing that Google-YouTube is "pursuing a deliberate strategy of engaging in, permitting, encouraging, and facilitating massive copyright infringement" in order to increase the value of Google by generating more traffic which it could monetize without having to pay for.

Why is this British suit particularly interesting? Remember the fact that Google already has 75% share of the search market in the UK?

  • IAC/ask.com competitor has been running ads against Google saying "stop the information monopoly" in London as reported by the Wall Street Journal.

The evidence continues to mount the charges that Google is engaged in rampant intellectual property racketeering, have substantial merit.  

  • What will be most interesting is when one of these suits goes to "discovery" and the plaintiffs can see Google execs internal emails to show that Google has well-understood, documented, and deliberate business strategy to profit by using, but not paying for, intellectual property of all kinds: trademarks, books, news articles, videos, etc.

Bottomline: Google is extremely vulnerable here long term.

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