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Google's "black box" search engine is the opposite of "open"

Google continues its self-serving campaign of "open for you, but not for me."
The master of the double standard, Google loves to claim that Google is "open" and even has the gall to name its net neutrality coalition the "Open Internet Coalition."
However, does Google really support "open" principles? In other words, Google talks the talk, but does it walk the walk?

  • Or is Google just playing lip service to "openness" in order to gain a competitive advantage with special Washington treatment and generous corporate welfare?
    • The facts indicate it.

Elise Ackerman of the San Jose Mercury News had a noteworthy and relevant article on this issue: "Google's growth has come at a price."

  • The article mentions that concerns over the lack of "openness" in Google's search, are "driving the effort to develop an open-source search engine."
    • "Search should be transparent, open and participatory," said Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia... Wales says Internet search is plagued by the same problems that bedeviled proprietary software - lack of accountability, transparency and freedom."
    • "Google closely guards its top-secret formula for ranking Web sites, making it impossible for a publisher to know why a site might enjoy front-page ranking one day in the search results and drop to Page 100 the next."
    • "... Wales' programmers will publicly disclose their algorithms for ranking results in the Wikia Search project."

Well Google, if openness is truly an important principle to Google, why not agree to make Google's search algorithm, which is the industry's ultimate "Black Box", "open" to all so all can benefit?

  • Could it be that Google only embraces the principle of openness when it is personally expedient?
    • According to the article: "Google already makes liberal use of open-source software."
      • So why not "open" Google's "black box" search algorithm so everyone could benefit?
    • In Google's lobbying for net neutrality, Google is urging the government to open up all "broadband" access technologies but not all "Internet" access technologies like browsers and search, even though Google has more market share in search than any broadband carrier has in broadband.
      • Could it possibly be that Google is just slickly promoting "openness" only when it benefits Google?
        • Sure looks that way.
Q&A One Pager Debunking Net Neutrality Myths